Thursday, March 29, 2012

Bee-ware!

This is not good. Another major reason why we should all move toward natural and organic gardening methods. What would we do without our pollinators and honey?!

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/03/neonicotinoids-bee-collapse/

Put down the problematic poisons and protect our precious pollinators, please!

6 comments:

Jenny said...

That's why I don't use pesticides or anything that is not organic.

1st Man said...

Amen!!! And ditto to what Jenny said, we don't use any pesticide or non organic stuff. I don't even use it on the front yard or bushes at the house in town, even though there is no food growing stuff nearby. I just hate the thought of all those chemicals.

Indie said...

I've read about this. It is sad how Bayer changed and manipulated the tests to get these pesticides past the EPA, and how the EPA just let them slide. At least one of the big pesticides is up for review - I certainly hope they ban it or at least limit its use!

KL said...

Thanks for the article. Not only bees, but even other pollinators like wasps and butterflies are declining due to all these chemicals. And, do you know the tragedy? - Every year at least 1000 different chemicals are produced and released in the market in various form and we are not even aware of it.

.09 Acres said...

Thanks everybody for chiming in. We are headed for agricultural disaster if the country keeps pushing forward with destructive chemicals, GMO crops, extensively patented seeds, etc. The only thing we can do is stand up for our beliefs!

Tom @ Tall Clover Farm said...

I really don't know why people waste their money on all these pesticides. Growing a healthy garden has more to do with soil stewardship and best practices. For instance, I started picking up and removing all of my coddling moth and apple maggot infested apples and tossed them to the chickens. Two years later, only a few fruits are affected by those two culprits. Be patient, it does take a little time for your garden to revive itself after being poisoned for years and for beneficial insects to return and thrive.